Asperger’s Syndrome May Not Be A Physical Disability

The Social Security Administration defines a physical handicap as”a decrease in the capability to execute typical of lifestyle activities due to injury or illness.” A physical disability can affect people of any age, sex, race, or ethnic background. Typically it means that a individual cannot physically perform the very same activities they have been able to before their handicap. If a physical handicap causes a reduction in a individual’s capacity to do one of these tasks of daily living, then the individual is regarded as experiencing a physical disability. The definition does not expressly define the actions that have to be performed so as to meet the definition, but it does describe the type of function that must be gained.

Asperger’s Syndrome May Not Be A Physical Disability

An acquired brain injury is another kind of physical handicap. An acquired brain injury describes an injury that occurs when part of their brain is damaged. This type of injury can have a wide assortment of effects on a individual’s capacity to live their life to the fullest, such as loss of self-esteem, communication skills, memory, and emotional health, capability to get involved in life-sustaining activities, and even novelty. Acquired brain injuries can range from a moderate injury for example whiplash to a painful coma.

Another type of handicap is an intellectual handicap. Intellectual disabilities are often diagnosed when a person fails to achieve a normal level of intellect, with specific language or cognitive processes affected. A good example of an intellectual handicap might be dyslexia, autism, and cerebral palsy. Intellectual disabilities may also lead to a genetic condition.

Asperger’s Syndrome May Not Be A Physical Disability

Physical disabilities are most frequent among younger individuals who are unable to live life to the fullest because of injury or illness. Examples of physical disabilities include Crohn’s disease, birth defects, paralysis, and growth disorders. Emotional disabilities stem from traumatic experiences like abuse, neglect, or abandonment. And sometimes physical disabilities are more indicative of a medical condition.

The kinds of lodging offered for someone that has been hurt in the office are extremely different than lodging available for somebody who has an intellectual handicap. Intellectual disabilities, such as low level IQ and learning difficulties, affect the workplace, as well as social and recreational opportunities. As a result, individuals with disabilities who need workplace adjustments can frequently make more awareness of their disabling condition by looking for help to adapt to their problem.

Asperger’s Syndrome May Not Be A Physical Disability

In addition, there are many different kinds of physical disabilities. Motor impairments affect motor skills and movement, in addition to strength. Vision impairments may include astigmatism, presbyopia, or other eye issues. Hearing impairments may include ear infections, hearing loss, or damage due to an injury or disorder. And there are other types of physical ailments, including psychiatric, psychological retardation, and cerebral palsy.

But perhaps the most popular physical disability is what affects the functioning of the entire body. Conditions like chronic pain, which may involve conditions such as fibromyalgia, sclerosis, or perhaps cancer, affects the ability to operate independently and to maneuver around the home. All these folks can require a variety of therapies and body care systems in order to be able to get the job done. Multiple sclerosis patients, by way of example, may need ongoing therapy to enhance the ability to move or to host muscles that are very stiff or weak due to the effects of multiple sclerosis.

Asperger’s Syndrome May Not Be A Physical Disability

But occasionally, a physical disability only affects certain parts of the human body. For instance, muscle fatigue can limit a patient’s capacity to squat correctly. Or, a individual with poor eyesight may require eyeglasses or contact lenses to be able to see things clearly. A person with Asperger’s syndrome also can require specific therapies and body support systems to allow them to work or live in their everyday lives.

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